Introduction

The website contains the professional profile of PhD Arafat Nasser. I hold a MSc in pharmacy from the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (University of Copenhagen). In 2012, I received the PhD degree at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (University of Copenhagen).

My area of expertise is neuroscience mainly focusing on pain research. Research activities focus on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying chronic pain mainly devoted on adaptations that occur in the tetrahydrobiopterin pathway. Moreover, parts of my research focus on affective diseases including anxiety and depression.

During my research carrier I have gained extensive expertise and skills in (1) establishment and validation of rodent in vivo test and models, (2) data and statistical analysis, (3) in vitro and ex vivo techniques involving biomarker analysis, gene expression and immunoblotting and (4) experimental clinical research.

Recent publications

Nasser A, Ali S, Wilsbech S, Bjerrum OJ, Møller LB (2015). Intraplantar injection of tetrahydrobiopterin induced nociception in mice. Neurosci. Lett., 584, 247-252.

Nasser A, Møller LB, Olesen JH, Konradsen LS, Andreasen JT (2014). Anxiety- and depression-like phenotype of hph-1 mice deficient in tetrahydrobiopterin. Neurosci. Res., 89, 44-53. 

Nasser A, Ali S, Bjerrum OJ, Møller LB (2014). Intraplantar injection of tetrahydrobiopterin induces acute nociception in mice without involvement of nitric oxide. Poster abstract.

Nasser A, Møller A, Jensen TS, Ole J Bjerrum, Møller LB (2014). GCH1 mutations and their effects on pain sensitivity in mice and man. Poster abtract. 

 

News

The PRDM12 gene: A new gene essential for the sensation of pain.
A study by Chen et al. published in Nature Genetics 2015 May 25 doi: 10.1038/ng.3308. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 26005867

Dysfunction of Cortical Dendritic Integration in Neuropathic Pain: A New Site for Chronic Pain Plasticity
A study by Santello M and Nevian T. Published in Neuron. 2015 Apr 8; 86(1):233-46. Epub 2015 Mar 26. PMID: 25819610.